Weeping Rock

Rating: 
Round Trip Distance: 0.6 miles
Difficulty: Easy
Elevation: 4380 - 4478 feet
Cellphone: 0 bars
Usage: Hiking - No Dogs
Time: 30 mins.
Facilities: Vault toilet
Trailhead: Weeping Rock
Fee: $25/vehicle or $12/person
Attractions: Scenic views, wildflowers
   


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The Weeping Rock trail is located in Zion National Park. The short trail leads to an alcove where water seeps through the sandstone rock and rains down from above creating a hanging garden of flowers and ferns. The trail is accessed by taking one of the free shuttle buses to the Weeping Rock bus stop in Zion Canyon.


During the off season the road to the Weeping Rock trailhead is open to passenger cars. The free shuttle buses are by far the best way to get around in the canyon though.


The Hidden Canyon, Observation Point and East Rim trails share the same trailhead with Weeping Rock. After crossing the pedestrian bridge follow the signs to the left for Weeping Rock.


The entire trail to Weeping Rock is paved.


The steepness of the trail along with the steps at the end make it unsuitable for wheelchairs. Baby strollers should do just fine up to the steps.


Water seems to seep through the rock pretty much everywhere above the alcove.


Standing in the alcove and looking out over the valley is almost like looking out a window on a rainy day.


Monkeyflowers are a common treat around seeps and hanging gardens.


The Great White Throne is told to be the most photographed site in Zion National Park. Its towering cliffs seem to dominate this portion of Zion Canyon and it even makes for a nice picture from Weeping Rock where it rises over 2200 feet higher in elevation.


Weeping Rock is a good trail for the casual hiker and people with small children. The trail is short, paved and only has about 100 feet of elevation gain. There are trail side signs that bring various plants to your attention with a little information so you can learn something about them. There is also a good explanation of how seeps come to be and where the water that drips out of them comes from. If you would like to see it for yourself then all you have to do is 'Take a hike'.